DanceSafe Promoting Health and Safety

  • #TestIt Alert: Round light cyan pill with ‘M30’ stamped inside of a square on one side sold in San Luis, AZ as Oxycodone but actually contains acetaminophen, 4-Methylaminoantipyrine, fentanyl, and 4-ANPP
    by Rachel Clark on 20 Giugno 2019 at 21:43

    By: Rachel Clark, DanceSafe Intern A light cyan round tablet with ‘M30’ in a rounded rectangular square on one side and a score line with a ‘30’ above it on the other was sold as Oxycodone in San Luis, AZ, but tested as acetaminophen, 4-Methylaminoantipyrine, fentanyl, and 4-ANPP. The sample was both sourced in and submitted from San Luis, AZ. The sample did not react with Marquis, Mecke, or Mandelin reagents. Despite being sold as Oxycodone, an opioid that is frequently used for recreational purposes, the pill contains acetaminophen (Tylenol; anti-inflammatory and mild analgesic) as well as fentanyl (an extremely powerful synthetic opioid that has been responsible for numerous overdose deaths in recent years). Additionally, two metabolites of other drugs – 4-Methylaminoantipyrine (a metabolite of Dipyrone, a very popular non-opioid analgesic) and 4-ANPP (a metabolite of fentanyl) – were found in the sample. This pill presents a very powerful combination of substances, all of which mimic traditional painkilling and sedating properties of opioids such as Oxycodone. The press and color of the pill are, likewise, intended to imitate existing prescription pills, which can cause a false sense of security in buyers. Substances not purchased directly from a physician are highly prone to adulteration. Fentanyl adulteration has been responsible for tens of thousands of deaths in the last several years in the U.S. alone. It has been estimated that over 30% of opioid overdoses also involve the presence of benzodiazepines. The combination of benzodiazepines and fentanyl (as well as other opioids, and depressants such as alcohol and DXM) is particularly dangerous because of the phenomenon of respiratory depression, in which a person’s breathing is drastically slowed and reduced in effectiveness. Prominent respiratory depression (such as respiratory depression due to opioid and/or depressant overdose) leads to blue-tinted extremities from oxygen deprivation, loss of consciousness, and sometimes seizures. If you intend on consuming opioids, please use around someone you trust who can administer naloxone if needed. If you believe that you are witnessing an opioid-related overdose, look for the following three symptoms: Constricted pupils, unconsciousness, and respiratory depression (identifiable by examining a person’s breathing patterns, depth of breath, and blue skin tint). Immediately call emergency medical personnel, and then place the person in the recovery position. If the person stops breathing, begin administering CPR right away. If it’s accessible to you, undergo training in Naloxone (Narcan) administration, and carry it on you at all times. We urge our community to keep in mind that drug markets are expansive and that this adulterated Oxycodone pill may appear in places other than its source and submission location. Using a reagent test kit can help provide a first line of defense as a presumptive (and not affirmative) process. Additionally, samples may be sent in to www.ecstasydata.org for in-depth laboratory testing. Test before you ingest to avoid taking misrepresented substances, and so you can adjust your intention, set, and setting appropriately to minimize risks. You can purchase your DanceSafe test kit here. The purpose of #TestIt Alerts is to alert the public to misrepresented substances circulating in their region. We neither condemn nor condone drug use, but rather want people to be aware of what they are ingesting so they can take steps to minimize risks. Since 1998, DanceSafe has been keeping the electronic music and nightlife communities safe. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, we provide free harm reduction services at music festivals and nightlife events across the nation. All proceeds from the sales of our drug checking kits go back into the organization so we can continue to provide our services to our communities for free. By purchasing a kit, you are not only helping keep you and your friends safe, you are also contributing to the harm reduction movement. Thank you for your support! […]

  • #TestIt Alert: Capsule of white powder sold as Alprazolam (Xanax) in North Carolina found to contain exclusively Flualprazolam
    by Rachel Clark on 20 Giugno 2019 at 5:53

    By: Rachel Clark, DanceSafe Intern A rectangular green pressed bar was sold as Alprazolam (Xanax) in North Carolina, but tested as Flualprazolam. The sample was sourced from online (Florida) and submitted from North Carolina.   The sample is in the form of a green, rectangular “bar”-shaped pill with two score lines and “S | 90” on the score side (no markings on the back). According to EcstasyData.org, Marquis, Mecke, and Mandelin reagents did not react with the sample, a response that is typical of benzodiazepines. Flualprazolam is a research chemical that consists of fluorinated Alprazolam. Very little is understood about its mechanism of action, as there is virtually no documented history of human consumption; however, the dosage of Flualprazolam is approximately half of that of Alprazolam, as it is known to be a more powerful benzodiazepine than Alprazolam. Additionally, Flualprazolam is known to have a duration of action that can be approximately double that of Alprazolam. Both the potency and length of action of Flualprazolam should be taken into consideration when deciding whether to consume it. Benzodiazepines are capable of producing both addiction and dependence in users, even when used as prescribed by a physician. This class of substances produces marked depression (slowing/dampening) of the central nervous system, similarly to alcohol – combining benzodiazepines and substances such as opioids or other depressants (alcohol, DXM, etc.) can lead to potentially very dangerous or fatal slowing of breathing and heart rate. Additionally, combining or overindulging in benzodiazepines can induce loss of consciousness, blackouts, and vomiting. Flualprazolam is approximately twice as potent as Alprazolam, which poses the potential for experiencing negative/unwanted side effects if consumed in excess. We urge our community to keep in mind that drug markets are expansive and that this adulterated Alprazolam capsule may appear in places other than its source and submission location. Benzodiazepines do not have consistent or reliable testing results with reagent kits, and utilizing fentanyl test strips prior to ingesting benzodiazepines purchased from any source other than a pharmacist is critically important. Using a reagent test kit can help provide a first line of defense as a presumptive (and not affirmative) process. Additionally, samples may be sent in to www.ecstasydata.org for in-depth laboratory testing. Test before you ingest to avoid taking misrepresented substances, and so you can adjust your intention, set, and setting appropriately to minimize risks. You can purchase your DanceSafe test kit here. The purpose of #TestIt Alerts is to alert the public to misrepresented substances circulating in their region. We neither condemn nor condone drug use, but rather want people to be aware of what they are ingesting so they can take steps to minimize risks. Since 1998, DanceSafe has been keeping the electronic music and nightlife communities safe. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, we provide free harm reduction services at music festivals and nightlife events across the nation. All proceeds from the sales of our drug checking kits go back into the organization so we can continue to provide our services to our communities for free. By purchasing a kit, you are not only helping keep you and your friends safe, you are also contributing to the harm reduction movement. Thank you for your support! […]

  • #TestIt Alert: Capsule of white powder sold as diclazepam in San Francisco, CA found to contain exclusively EMB-FUBINACA and AB-FUBINACA
    by Rachel Clark on 16 Giugno 2019 at 23:15

    A gel capsule of white powder was sold as diclazepam (a synthetic depressant in the benzodiazepine class) in San Francisco, CA, but tested as EMB-FUBINACA and AB-FUBINACA. The sample was both sourced and submitted from San Francisco, CA. The capsule was clear, with an overall weight of 349mg, and contained an off-white powder. According to EcstasyData.org, Marquis, Mecke, and Mandelin reagents all turned orange during the reaction (with Marquis only reacting very slightly). EMB-FUBINACA and AB-FUBINACA are both synthetic cannabinoids with limited histories of human use. […]

  • New DanceSafe supporter pin – Xochipilli by Blank Mind Designs
    by Mitchell Gomez on 15 Giugno 2019 at 23:00

    New from Blank Mind Designs, this INCREDIBLE Xochipilli pin will look incredible wherever you wear it, and show the world that you are a supporter of DanceSafe. 100% of the proceeds of this sale go to our life saving harm-reduction mission! Limit 2 per household please! This is a ‘blind bag’ pin, meaning the variant you end up with is determined by chance (but hey, they are ALL gorgeous)! You can buy these now using the paypal link below, and as always, thank you for your support! Xōchipilli, the Aztec ‘Flower Prince’. In the mid-1800’s, a 16th century Aztec statue of Xochipilli was unearthed on the side of the volcano Popocatapetl near Tlamanalco. The statue is of a single figure seated upon a temple-like base. Both the statue and the base upon which it sits are covered in carvings of sacred and psychoactive flowers including mushrooms (Psilocybe aztecorum), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), morning glory (Turbina corymbosa), sinicuichi (Heimia salicifolia), possibly cacahuaxochitl (Quararibea funebris), and one unidentified flower. […]

  • #TestIt Alert: Light yellow tab with hot air balloon blotter art found to contain DOC in San Francisco, CA
    by Kristin Karas on 13 Giugno 2019 at 19:28

    An off-white/light yellow tab with a hot air balloon print on it was sold as something “similar to LSD” in San Francisco, CA, but tested as DOC. The sample was both sourced in and submitted from San Francisco, CA. […]

  • #TestIt Alert: White pressed “bar” sold as Alprazolam (Xanax) in Atlanta, GA found to contain fentanyl or fentanyl analog
    by Kristin Karas on 11 Giugno 2019 at 0:52

    By: Rachel Clark, DanceSafe Intern A 3-scored white rectangular pill marked with the numbers “6242” was sold as Alprazolam (Xanax) in Atlanta, GA, but failed two separate fentanyl strip tests, indicating the presence of fentanyl or one of its analogs. This pill and accompanying test images were submitted by an individual local to Atlanta. It is unclear where the source of the pill was. Fentanyl is an extremely powerful opioid, a class of pain-relieving drugs with high potential for causing both problematic use and dependence over time. Fentanyl is approximately 50 times more powerful than heroin. Alprazolam (Xanax) is a drug of the benzodiazepine class, a category of drugs whose effects include significant depression of the central nervous system, anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) properties, and sedation. Benzodiazepines are often prescribed for panic and anxiety disorders. However, this class of drugs (similarly to opioids) has high potential for both problematic use and dependence, even when used as directed by a physician. It is common for benzodiazepines such as Alprazolam to be adulterated (“cut”) with opioids because of their shared effects of causing relaxation, sedation, and (in some users) euphoria of varying degrees. Since fentanyl is powerful in such minute quantities – a dose the size of a pen tip is enough to induce an overdose – “cutting” Alprazolam with it is a cheap and effective way of increasing the sedating strength of the pill, while simultaneously reducing the amount of actual Alprazolam needed to cause a high. Fentanyl adulteration has been responsible for tens of thousands of deaths in the last several years in the U.S. alone. It has been estimated that over 30% of opioid overdoses also involve the presence of benzodiazepines. The combination of benzodiazepines and fentanyl (as well as other opioids, and depressants such as alcohol and DXM) is particularly dangerous because of the phenomenon of respiratory depression, in which a person’s breathing is drastically slowed and reduced in effectiveness. Prominent respiratory depression (such as respiratory depression due to opioid and/or depressant overdose) leads to blue-tinted extremities from oxygen deprivation, loss of consciousness, and sometimes seizures. If you intend on consuming opioids, please use around someone you trust who can administer naloxone if needed. If you believe that you are witnessing an opioid-related overdose, look for the following three symptoms: constricted pupils, unconsciousness, and respiratory depression (identifiable by examining a person’s breathing patterns, depth of breath, and blue skin tint). Immediately call emergency medical personnel, and then place the person in the recovery position. If the person stops breathing, begin administering CPR right away. If it’s accessible to you, get trained to administer naloxone, and carry it on you at all times. We urge our community to keep in mind that drug markets are expansive and that this adulterated Alprazolam pill may appear in places other than its source and submission location. Test before you ingest to avoid taking misrepresented substances, and so you can adjust your intention, set, and setting appropriately to minimize risks. You can purchase your DanceSafe test kit and fentanyl test strips here. The purpose of #TestIt Alerts is to alert the public to misrepresented substances circulating in their region. We neither condemn nor condone drug use, but rather want people to be aware of what they are ingesting so they can take steps to minimize risks. Since 1998, DanceSafe has been keeping the electronic music and nightlife communities safe. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, we provide free harm reduction services at music festivals and nightlife events across the nation. All proceeds from the sales of our drug checking kits go back into the organization so we can continue to provide our services to our communities for free. By purchasing a kit, you are not only helping keep you and your friends safe, you are also contributing to the harm reduction movement. Thank you for your support! […]

  • DanceSafe Announces Return to Virginia
    by Kristin Karas on 28 Maggio 2019 at 23:52

    Virginia, WE ARE BACK! Virginia DanceSafe has regrouped thanks to dedicated recruiters and our newest DanceSafe Officers. With a background in event promotion, harm reduction, drug policy reform, and community organizing, the Virginia DanceSafe team is ready to hit the ground running in late June 2019. […]

  • Introduction to Navigating Power Dynamics
    by Kristin Karas on 24 Maggio 2019 at 22:53

    By: Sloane Ferenchak, #WeLoveConsent Intern, DanceSafe Bear Michael, #WeLoveConsent Communications & Social Media Intern, DanceSafe #WeLoveConsent seeks to help dismantle rape culture and build a consent culture within the electronic music and nightlife communities. #WeLoveConsent initiatives and services focus on building a consent culture and reducing the incidence of sexual violence in nightlife settings through consent education and bystander intervention. As part of these initiatives, we are publishing a #WeLoveConsent Toolbox Blog Series which focuses on providing the fundamental knowledge our community needs to practice affirmative consent and to help us build a consent culture in the electronic music and nightlife communities. In our first #WeLoveConsent Toolbox article, we began talking about consent and affirmative, empowering ways to establish consent with your partner(s). An important aspect of establishing consensual sexual interactions is learning how to navigate imbalanced power dynamics. Most people desire sex and want to have fun, mutually pleasurable, consensual sexy time. Uneven power dynamics can alter the dynamics of sexual relationships and experiences, giving some people more power and influence than others in sexual encounters. When there is a power imbalance in a sexual relationship, people can feel anxious and/or pressure to do things they might not be comfortable with in the moment. Let’s explore this a bit more to help clarify what some power dynamics look like and how you can work towards evening the power differential through two steps: (1) recognizing and identifying potential differences in power, and (2) communication. Key Concepts to Know about Power, Privilege, and Consent Power dynamics are differences in access to power, authority, and influence over others. They exist as a result of hierarchical systems of power that privilege certain individuals and marginalize others. These systems can be social, cultural, or economic, and include systems such as patriarchy, white supremacy, and cisheteronormativity. People’s power and influence are based on their socioeconomic position, job, race, gender, sexuality and so on. Those at the top of the system hold more power and influence as a result of their privilege, and those at the bottom have fewer resources, less power, and are often taken advantage of by those in power. Having intersecting identities can also influence where someone stands in the “social hierarchy:” a person may be at the top of the “hierarchy” as a white cisgender straight man, but they will be much lower on the hierarchy if they are a transgender queer black woman. Occupying different social positions gives people different lived experiences and different access to power to shape the world around them. Because no two people have the same exact lived experience, any relationship has the potential to have a power imbalance. Power is not inherently good or bad, but with a privileged social position a person has more social credibility and influence that can be misused to take advantage of others or pressure them into doing things they don’t want to do. People with power may also not be aware of how their actions negatively impact or influence the decision making of less powerful people. Power imbalances can make it difficult to recognize if consent is freely given, and can even make consent impossible. This is why when we talk about consent, we also need to discuss the impact of power on a person’s ability to consent in sexual interactions and how power can be abused in and out of the bedroom. How Power can be Flexed: Social Pressure, Sexual Coercion, and Sexual Violence Having power gives a person the ability to impact the lives of those who they have power over, which can be used to manipulate people into doing what they want. Sexual coercion can occur in sexual encounters with power imbalances. Sexual coercion is any unwanted sexual activity that happens when a person is pressured, threatened, or forced in a non-physical way by someone who holds power or authority over them. Sexual coercion makes a person feel like they owe sex to someone or that they don’t have the choice to say “no.” People can be coerced by those who hold power over them for fear of losing their livelihood, reputation, or safety. People can also be coerced by people they are in relationships with, such as when a partner threatens a break up if the person won’t have sex with them, or makes them believe that it is too late to say “no.” Power differentials can also play out in less obvious ways. People can exert their power without coercing them directly. People know when others hold power over them regardless of whether the person in power threatens to use it. For example, a person knows they could be kicked out of a venue by the owner if they do not give in to them, and a fan could feel the social pressure to hook up with their favorite DJ and may not think that they can back out of it if they want to. It may be hard to tell when someone is being coerced in these situations. A person may also feel pressured by people they know, or their romantic partner(s), such as when a person feels like they owe sex to their partner(s) to keep them happy. The power imbalance in relationships can also contribute to sexual violence. We can see the frequency of the abuse of power in sexual relationships when we look at the high rates of sexual assault in the US. Sexual assault is possible due to power, and occurs as a result of power. Sexual predators use power differentials to manipulate their targets, whether it is to coerce them into sex, use their physical power to overcome them, or prevent their victims from reporting by using social or economic force against them. In fact, most sexual assault is not due to sexual desire but due to a desire to overpower someone and assert control. Navigating Power Dynamics in Consent Although there is always a power differential in sexual encounters, there are steps we can take to try... […]

  • #TestIt Alert: Purple heart-shaped ecstasy tablet found to contain MDMA and N-Methylethylone in Charlotte, NC
    by Kristin Karas on 13 Maggio 2019 at 11:34

    A purple heart tablet submitted to ecstasydata.org was sold as Ecstasy/MDMA, but tested as MDMA and N-Methylethylone. The sample was both sourced in and submitted from Charlotte, NC. […]

  • DanceSafe Welcomes Two New Board Members to the Leadership Team!
    by Madalyn McElwain on 11 Aprile 2019 at 16:58

    By: DanceSafe Staff We are excited to announce the addition of two stellar individuals to the DanceSafe board of directors. Please help us welcome Jessica Breemen and Monique Chavez to the leadership team! Jessica is a multi-faceted practitioner with over 10 years experience coaching creative strategies, intelligent solutions, and continuous improvement to complex problems with individuals, teams, and communities through servant leadership. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice & Criminology and will graduate with her Master of Social Work (MSW) in 2020. Her research has focused on criminal justice and drug policy reform, as well as full spectrum harm reduction. Jessica interned with DanceSafe National during her 2017-2018 school year and is currently a Scrum Master in the IT department of a state government agency. Monique comes to DanceSafe with over 16 years of experience in harm reduction, event production, project management and anything legal. Born and raised in Albuquerque, NM, Monique is a two-time graduate from the University of New Mexico, earning both a BS in Biology and a Juris Doctor. Monique’s passion for drug policy reform grew from her early experiences in the New Mexico nightlife community, as the former co-founder of Students for Sensible Drug Policy, through an internship with the Drug Policy Alliance, and as the former founding director of New Mexico NORML. Monique is passionate about providing honest and open drug education and awareness to the general public, where the stigma of drug use is still unscathed. With the combined experience of Jessica and Monique, our organization will only continue to reach new heights, and we couldn’t be more excited about their addition to our board of directors! […]

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